Category Archives: Social Media

LinkedIn, The Star Spangled Banner and the Tea Party Movement

After that little interaction with the nice lady at the networking event, not much else transpired on the “Ken and Erin” front for most of the year.  Armed with new insight into Erin’s integrity, based not only on the LinkedIn email, but also a friend of a friend’s experience with her as a businesswoman, I felt the urgency to steer clear of both of them even more strongly. As I’ve mentioned, I was not out to ruin anyone’s marriage, though the deception displayed by Erin in pretending to be her husband and writing that ridiculous message does make me wonder about the state of their union.

If their marriage was solid and strong, why would a fictionalized novel even have the power to drive her to do something so outrageous in the first place? Did she stop to think about his reaction? Assuming we were having an affair (which I’ve stated is not the case), did she honestly think I’d broadcast it in an email?

Oh yes, Kenny, I want to tell the whole world about your johnson! And while I’m at it, I’ll give them an explicit account of every extramarital tryst we’ve shared, so everyone will know what we’ve been up to!

I mean, it’s simply absurd.

Now one thing I do remember about “Ken” is that like me, he can be overly sensitive; he can also  transform from fun-loving and full-of-life to angry and defensive if he feels hurt or betrayed by someone else’s behavior. I can’t imagine he reacted well upon receiving my forwarded email of the original request, and can only surmise that at the very least, they had one heck of a fight about it. Speaking for myself, if my husband had logged onto a website using my credentials in an effort to “trap” an old boyfriend, that alone would infuriate me.

And if she really thought it possible that he’d been cheating, why not confront him about it directly and calmly? Why add insult to injury by being deceptive?

Looking back, I guess I must’ve salvaged a Christmas Holiday for her, because it took me until the day before New Year’s Eve to even respond, that’s how taken aback I was.

But as 2009 unfolded, I concentrated exclusively on promoting my book, co-hosting internet talk shows, getting involved in the grassroots Tea Party Movement, editing for clients, blogging and otherwise avoiding any potential run-ins with Ken and Erin, either in cyberspace or in real life. Funny, but I’ve lived just two miles away from them all these years and have never once spontaneously bumped into either one, ever.

But in December of 2009, I received an email from “Ken” (who’d also included some pretty big media names in the distribution, like Sean Hannity). This time, it was nothing personal, just a copy of his email response to a stupid liberal sportswriter who thought it was a great idea to eliminate the singing of The Star Spangled Banner at professional sporting events. By this time I’d been contributing regularly to Parcbench, Canada Free Press and my other blog, Palin Drone. I have a pretty good idea that “Ken” had been checking out my posts and hence, thought I could get his editorial letter additional exposure, which I did. I’m sure he also knew it was a hot-button topic for me; one that I would not be able to resist commenting about.

So perhaps knowing I shared his passion for the subject and the USA, he’d sent this to me as a way of re-establishing communication? Who knows. But it did give me a great idea for a story, which in the end was published on the Parcbench site. I am also incorporating it into my sequel, Sea To Shining Sea, as a letter Ken writes to the editor, because it fits in perfectly with the plot and themes unfolding in that story.

“Ken’s” request for distribution led to a series of cordial email communications — none of which so much as mentioned Water Signs — prompting me to use the opportunity to set the record straight about the LinkedIn debacle. In very clear terms, I recounted the entire story of how I’d put all of the pieces together, which ultimately verified my initial gut instincts. He replied that he never uses LinkedIn much at all (we have that in common, too) and confirmed “It sounds like you have figured out that it was not me”.

And I was relieved to finally get it out in the open. For whatever reason, it was bugging me that — as far as he knew — I still believed that tacky, immature email came from him and not his wife. For that matter, I wanted her to be aware that I was on to her little schemes, and in fact, told him forthrightly I “wanted this nonsense to stop”.  And it has.

However, social media would prove to be revealing on other ways as far as these two were concerned. More on that in my next post.

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Music Review: Ava Aston’s “Gone”


Since becoming actively involved in social media sites like Facebook two years ago, I’ve come across a plethora of undiscovered, artistic talent. And in the realm of modern music, songbird and lyricist Ava Aston – with a voice that is simultaneously sweet, powerful and provocative – stands alone.

Her debut CD entitled Gone showcases the impressive range not just of her vocals, but also her musical style and creativity. Sometimes edgy and defiant, as in the electrifying title track and in the high-energy single What Do I Gotta Say; other times tender and poignant as in the heart-tugging ballad, I Carry You With Me — for which she was awarded the Grand Prize in the SAW Mid-Atlantic International Song Contest – Ava’s unforgettable performances speak to the human experience and leave you wanting to hear more.

For those with the heart of a patriot, her most recent effort, We The People, an inspiring anthem to the indomitable American spirit, will reaffirm your faith in the power and determination of everyday Americans to return their country to its constitutional roots.

In a day and age where pop stars are manufactured creations of a pop culture gone crazy, it’s nice to know there are truly talented, wholesome and upstanding artists producing quality work. I have no doubt Ava’s star is on the rise and it’s only a matter of time before she’s signed by a smart record label. Until then, why not support a singer who is not only fabulously gifted, glamorous and beautiful, but also wholesome and patriotic? Both personally and professionally Ava proves it’s possible to sound great, look hot and maintain one’s integrity – in short, she’s a breath of fresh air on the music and entertainment scene.

Purchase her CD Gone today.  If you appreciate powerful vocals and unique, eclectic musical arrangements, you’ll be happy you did. And if you’re on Facebook, join her fan page here.

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Six Degrees of Separation

After the LinkedIn incident, I decided to leave well-enough alone. Thanks to another social media site, I’d figured out who’d been responsible, and though I was tempted to follow up my email to “Ken” with a phone call, better judgment prevailed. But a curious thing did take place soon after.

Before I get into that, I want to back up to June of 2008, and an interesting photography session. A good friend of mine — a professional photographer — spent an entire Saturday at my home, creating images that would eventually be employed for book promotion, including the back cover head shot of Water Signs. For the purposes of this story, it’s not necessary or even advisable to reveal her name, but I will mention that she’s one of my oldest and dearest friends in South Florida. In fact, the character of Isabella is partially based on this friend, along with another woman I used to know.

Although I absolutely hate posing for formal pictures, my friend and I had so much fun that day changing venues, outfits and poses. The community in which I live is rife with beautiful, outdoor scenery and locations, so we’d alternate indoor shots in my home with others out in front of the garden, with the palm fronds swaying  behind me.

Since we were together for a while that afternoon, I filled my friend in on the back story behind Water Signs, since — much like my close friend “Elyse” (Theresa), she’d known nothing about “Ken” — notwithstanding our 12-year friendship. As I’ve noted, the mind and will are powerful forces.

Anyway, as I relayed the information, something clicked with her, something pertaining to “Erin”. Seemed she had a friend who’d written a cookbook and sought out “Erin’s” professional services pertaining to web design and marketing. To be sure, she called her friend, who upon hearing the real name, confirmed it to be true.  To say that this woman had not been happy with the customer service she’d received would be an understatement.

My photographer friend had already known of her dissatisfaction, since she’d helped her locate another designer to complete the cookbook website — which happened to revolve around the state of Pennsylvania and its traditions (another ironic twist), including the Amish Country. This woman relayed several fascinating tidbits, such as never being allowed inside “Erin’s” house (site of her office). Whenever she needed to drop something off to the designer, she was immediately greeted just outside the front door or in the driveway; never once was she invited in.

As a customer, this woman found her hired designer to be quite rude, with a “basic” personality, lacking in depth and character. If I recall correctly, the last forms of communication they’d had via email (once the woman had secured a new person to finish the project), had been very terse. According to the friend of my friend, “Erin” was a typical “Philly Girl” — a phenomenon with which she was familiar, having been raised in the area.

So when the LinkedIn thing happened much later that same year, I can’t say I was surprised when I finally unraveled the mystery and discovered the real culprit.

About a week or so later, I attended a Boca Raton Meetup for entrepreneurs presented by  Jay Berkowitz. The information I gathered that evening proved to be invaluable, but the most memorable aspect of the event occurred long before Jay took to the podium. As is the case with most of these gatherings, every person in attendance was given a minute to introduce themselves and explain their business in brief. When it was my turn, I mentioned that I was an author as well as a web content writer, editor and blogger.

After all had introduced themselves, we were allowed some time to simply mingle  before the formal presentation. And that was when a very nice  woman, a financial planner, came right up to me and asked, “Do you know “Erin Lockheart”?

Oh, you mean the woman who while pretending to be her husband, asked me to recommend his “big johnson” via the LinkedIn social media site? That Erin Lockheart? Yes, I’m afraid I do know her.

While I wish I could’ve replied that way, I somehow managed to hide my surprise, stating something to the effect of “Yes, I’ve heard the name”. After which, the woman insisted on taking one of my business cards (which were in my hands, thus eliminating the excuse, “Oh, I am so sorry I must’ve run out of them”)  because she was pretty darned sure that  as a web designer, “Erin” might have a need for good content writers from time to time. Bless her heart, that lady was such a great networker. And I must admit, I got a chuckle out of imagining the whole scenario of this woman presenting Erin with my business card and glowing praise.

Yes, in Boca Raton there are definitely six degrees of separation. And this was only one of many forthcoming incidents to prove it.

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LinkedIn Deception

Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and to a much lesser extent, LinkedIn, have mostly proven an invaluable resource for me, not simply for promoting my book, but also for political activism, networking and even hosting internet radio programs like Conservative Republican Republican Forum (which recently celebrated its one-year anniversary) and The Liberty Belle Hour (still on hiatus until August).

But as I’ve learned in the political realm, social media — when employed by unscrupulous people — can also wreak havoc and damage innocent reputations, if left unchecked. And if I had a nickel for every time I’ve had to block a Ron Paul freak on Facebook, I’d be able to donate large sums of money to every conservative candidate of my choice.

On a personal note, before I parlayed my grassroots activism into an online revolutionary presence (along with countless other like-minded Americans), I experienced the downside of this new medium. In December of 2008, Water Signs had been on the market just three months, and I was busy finding new and creative ways to advertise it in cyberspace and in the real world. I hadn’t heard from “Ken” since our Labor Day chat, and other than knowing he’d created a free log-in on the website (which enables readers to sample five chapters), I had no idea if he’d even read the entire book — and if so — whether he loved or hated it.

Then one day in early December, I got a very strange request via the LinkedIn website, allegedly from “Ken”, who at the time was one of my connections (though for obvious reasons, no longer). Although I don’t spend much time at all on this site, never having developed a real liking for it, back then I utilized it quite a bit. And since I’d received many previous requests via LinkedIn for recommendations before, I was well-acquainted with their official style and format, versus a “fake” made to appear as if it’s coming from their site.

Anyway, this request for recommendation from “Kenneth Lockheart” looked like all of the others when I opened it up in my email account. However, when I read the personalized message, I knew immediately something was definitely off:

Dear Daria,

I am sending this to ask you for a brief recommendation of my work that I can include in my LinkedIn profile. If you have any questions, let me know. Responsible, professional, thorough…big johnson…what have you…haha…basically make something up.

Thanks in advance for helping me out. I will do the same. Let’s get creative.

First, for anyone who might not be aware, “johnson” is a colloquial term for a guy’s manhood, the equivalent of “gonads” or as Michelle Malkin once famously referred to them, “gumballs”. For all of his faults, the “Ken” I knew never disrespected me, nor did he ever use any sort of colorful language around me, even when angry. So for him to throw in the line about a “big johnson” was completely out of the norm. In fact, the moment I read the email, my intuition sounded the alarm that this ridiculous request did not in fact originate with “Ken”, but with his wife.

Secondly, other than the little he’d shared with me on the phone, I didn’t know much about “Ken’s” professional life, and was therefore unqualified to make a recommendation in the first place. I wasn’t a client who could testify to his excellent follow-up and pervasive knowledge of his product. I was just someone who remembered him as having a stellar work ethic, which is evident through my description of his character in Water Signs.

Lastly, the request came from out of the blue. As I mentioned, we’d not spoken in three months, during which time I’d published the book. If he didn’t think enough of the novel — in which a character based on him plays a dominant role — to email or call me with some kind of reaction, what on earth would compel him to suddenly ask for a reference via LinkedIn?

None of it made sense. And though I knew in my heart who the responsible party was, I am not one to throw out unfounded accusations. I needed some proof.

For a few weeks, I did nothing, as the hectic Christmas Season unfolded and I busied myself with the usual activities that characterize that time of year. However, during a visit to Philly later that month, my cousin encouraged me to email him to get to the truth. I regret that I refused to give him the benefit of the doubt when crafting my correspondence — per Annie’s protective instincts. I also regret that I allowed her to talk me into using “WTF” as the subject line. But my biggest mistake by far was failing to initially forward the original request to him, complete with the official LinkedIn header.

Instead, in a new email, I wrote:

Hey Ken,

Just had a minute to review my inbox again as I am extremely busy promoting my book. Quite honestly, your email had me very perplexed, thus explaining the subject line of this response. I am not sure exactly why you are asking for a recommendation since I’ve never been a client and haven’t been a part of your life in any meaningful way in quite a long time. As for the “johnson” comment, well…I obviously wouldn’t know anything about that. 🙂

Regarding the recommendation, I only give those out for people whose work I am familiar with.

Sorry I couldn’t help you,

Daria

I don’t know if he’s constantly plugged in via computer or BlackBerry, but his response was almost instantaneous, incredibly terse, definitely rude and — as you will note, lacking in proper punctuation:

recommendation? not sure what happened as I don’t need any… sorry. good luck with the book. hope your readers enjoy.. adios

That prompted me to dig through my emails to retrieve the original LinkedIn request and send it back to him, along with the subject line, “Maybe this will refresh your memory. Happy New Year!”

It would be nearly a year before I’d hear anything from him again.

However, a few weeks later the mystery was solved when MyLife.com sent me a link to a list of people who’d recently check out my profile (which I promptly deleted from that site). Surprise, surprise…”Erin” had been one of them. Moreover, she’d looked me up on December 9, and I’d received the LinkedIn request shortly thereafter. My gut instinct had been correct, it had been her all along. But rather than follow-up with “Ken”, I decided to let the matter drop.

This led me to conclude that both “Ken” and “Erin” had not only read Water Signs, but that it had opened up a torrent of emotion. What else would explain her deception in logging into a social media site with her husband’s credentials and falsely requesting a work recommendation from me?

But what exactly did she hope to gain? If she suspected her husband was being unfaithful, did she really think this was a viable method of catching him in the act? I suppose in the age of social media, such antiquated notions like hiring a private detective have gone the way of the beeper.

This is all very ironic as well, considering the fact that I haven’t even been in the same room with “Ken” since the mid-90s. If he’d in fact cheated on her, it certainly hadn’t been with me.

I don’t know what went through “Ken’s” mind when he saw the original LinkedIn email I forwarded, but I do know how hurt and angry I’d felt after he basically told me to go to hell. Come to think of it, that was quite an overreaction; was he really that offended by “WTF”? Hard to imagine.

Anyway, in January of 2009 — concurrent with discovering Erin’s LinkedIn deception, I attended a marketing seminar in Boca Raton, where the expression “six degrees of separation” would take on new and personal meaning. More on that in my next post.

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Erin in Water Signs: A Boca Babe Embodiment of the Culture of Self-Absorption

More than any other character drawn from my own life in Water Signs, Erin Mahoney Lockheart owes about 90% of her creation more to a stereotype than an actual person. Yes, there is a real fiancée and wife whose acquaintance I’d made many years ago, and those recollections formed a starting point for the character sketch. However, after having spent so many years in South Florida, I felt very strongly about including a commentary about what I call our current “culture of self-absorption”, and it was this desire that led to the evolution of Erin.

Throughout Boca Raton and the surrounding areas, I’d seen, heard, witnessed and experienced enough examples of self-serving, egotistical and superficial behavior to write an entire non-fiction book on the topic.  But since I was penning what would in the end be a triumph of virtue, integrity, traditional values and true love over all sorts of formidable obstacles, I had to find a way to highlight this theme via plot and character. And it didn’t take long to realize that Erin was the perfect vehicle through which to do just that.

So it’s only in the early stages of Part Two that Ken’s fiancée even remotely resembles her real-life counterpart (whose name has been completely changed), although in what is most likely a very dramatic departure from reality, Erin absolutely hates football — one of the many contrasts between her and Madeline purposely created for dramatic reasons. Although Ken confesses his commitment to another woman to Madeline in an earlier chapter (more on that in another post), it’s not until Chapter 24 that readers — along with Maddy, who has reluctantly agreed to attend a BBQ at their condo — meet her for the first time:

From the moment she entered their two-story condo on the fifth floor, she felt a distinctive yet subtle hostility in the air, similar to the one that had greeted her at Kenny’s real estate office awhile back. And though physically attractive with a willowy figure, blue eyes and silky blonde hair, Erin definitely exuded a hard, urban vibe, notwithstanding her impressive career and level of education.

Yet it wasn’t her tough, Philly accent and her rough-around-the-edges veneer that most impacted Madeline; it was her pervasive coldness and attitude of indifference. She barely engaged Maddy in conversation, though Ken’s former flame conducted herself with as much dignity as she could possibly muster under the circumstances. And while Kenny did his best to facilitate the flow of conversation, it wasn’t long before Maddy wished she hadn’t accepted his invitation in the first place. When Erin abruptly excused herself to go to bed — claiming a migraine headache — Madeline resolved to banish all thoughts of Ken and Erin from her mind forever.

In Part Two, Maddy performs her own rendition of this heartbreaking song from my favorite musical, Les Miserables for a local dance studio production.

This incident instigates a thirteen-year, self-imposed, selective amnesia on the part of Madeline, embarked upon for the sake of her own sanity and self-preservation (it’s also a compounding factor in her bout with panic and anxiety disorder). She literally forces herself to forget that either one of these people even exists, just as I did in real life. It was just too painful to cope with, too unbearable to work through, even though, like Madeline, I had many sympathetic shoulders I could’ve cried on (while this isn’t really explored in the novel, I suppose for myself pride was also to blame for my reticence in sharing this devastating news with someone, anyone who loved me).

And since the story is basically told from Madeline’s perspective, that’s the last we see of Ken and Erin for a period of time, while Maddy endures the nadir of her panic and anxiety problem before solving it via a psychic; offers forgiveness to her old boyfriend Jake Winston when he calls out of the blue; and finds some career success via her writing and communications skills.

In Chapter 25, I do provide a bit of foreshadowing and embellishment using an event that truly is straight out of real life:

Taking a seat in a nearby rocking chair, Ken leaned back and closed his eyes as thoughts of Maddy permeated his brain. How was she doing? Had she gotten married yet? Was she still writing? He hadn’t seen a copy of The Good News Gazette in a while, though he’d secretly held onto the copy his mother had brought over to his house just weeks after Bonnie’s birth. That was before Erin had set up a home-based business and taken a corporate position in the creative department of a local cosmetics company.

Paula Lockheart had entered Ken and Erin’s home that morning, armed with a stack of newspapers and magazines, which she’d carefully set down on the coffee table before heading into the nursery. As Ken walked through the living room on his way to make breakfast, a photo of two familiar faces caught his eye. And when he picked up the publication to take a closer look, his heart was filled with pride and longing.

Beneath the headline, “My Brother, My Hero”, and the byline bearing the author’s name, Madeline and Louis smiled back at him, seated at a round dining table. Wow. She’d finally achieved her goal of becoming a published writer. He well remembered the endless conversations — by the ocean, snuggled up on the couch or wrapped up under the satin sheets of his water bed — during which Maddy would eloquently share her dreams for the future. In spite of everything, he still missed that connection.

And much like his real-life inspiration, Ken calls the editor of the paper in an attempt to obtain Madeline’s phone number, only to be dejected when she refuses to give it out. Instead, she offers to share his contact information with her newest writer and allow her to decide if she wishes to dial the number. Skeptical of whether or not she’d actually take the initiative to call, he is thrilled when a few days later, his former girlfriend’s curiosity gets the better of her:

Ken felt the same powerful eruptions within at the sound of her voice, though she gave no indication of her personal status, opting instead to update him about her parents and siblings. Madeline also omitted from the conversation her ongoing struggle with panic disorder, preferring to keep the tone light, so as not to solicit any unwanted offers of help or worse — an invitation to dinner at his home. The last thing she needed was an evening with Ken, Erin and their new baby.

Thus, we’re starting to learn a bit more about Erin indirectly, by way of her husband’s lingering feelings for another woman. Readers already know from Chapter 19 that he’d had some reservations about going through with the wedding, confiding in Madeline that part of his motivation for doing so was that “we didn’t want to live in sin anymore”. And it’s also in this chapter that we get a glimpse into Erin’s personality when he notes how “she kind of depends on me” since most of her co-workers were busy with their own families and social lives. There’s a distinct impression that for all of her high-powered business acumen, Erin is also very high maintenance. This is confirmed (along with their eventual divorce) in Chapter 27 via Paula Lockheart’s internal musings during an outdoor power-walk:

Too bad her former daughter-in-law hadn’t shared that opinion. Oh sure, in the beginning she used him like a security blanket after she’d accepted a lucrative position with an ad agency in Miami and relocated from Atlantic City. Oddly, for such a talented and successful girl, Erin had more than her fair share of insecurities, depending on Ken to provide everything from a social life to a comfortable place to live.

And while he was working hard as a mortgage broker and real estate agent by day, and taking classes in marketing and business at Florida International University four nights a week, she constantly harangued him over stupid things, like buying her the “wrong” gift or not spending enough time together. Paula sighed as she recalled one particular Valentine’s Day, when Ken had inadvertently provoked Erin’s ire by buying her rollerblades — even though she’d been asking for them for months. That had been just one in a series of troubling incidents that should have prevented her son from walking down the aisle.

In Chapter 28, we get Ken’s perspective on his now ex-wife, and the reasons for the dissolution of their marriage:

Then there was the negative influence of the Boca Raton culture. While an exceedingly beautiful city and desirable place to live, Boca’s downside was the extreme superficiality of many of its residents, some of whom held positions of power within the community, from the local paper’s society page writer to the plethora of ambitious millionaires that populated upscale neighborhoods like Broken Sound, Royal Palm and The Sanctuary. While Ken envied no one, content to focus on his own goals, Erin got caught up in the web of botox, breast enhancements and liposuction that characterized the activities of the city’s wealthiest females.

And as her business thrived, so did her vanity, leading her to undergo a seemingly endless parade of plastic surgeries, all to assuage her fears of growing older, and to help her keep pace with the women with whom she networked for both business and social purposes. After almost thirteen years of marriage, Ken didn’t even recognize her — or was it more accurate to say he was just beginning to?

As a direct result of her own self-centered behavior, Erin’s marriage ultimately implodes. For all of his genuine efforts to make it work for the sake of their children, Ken realizes that without her willingness to change, it’s a futile undertaking. For a woman who had it all — a devoted husband, two healthy children, a beautiful home and a thriving career — Erin expressed very little in the way of gratitude, opting instead to focus exclusively on the superficial side of life. Thus, her humble Southwest Philly roots, doting childhood, foundation of faith and hard-earned education are tossed aside for the pursuit of all things material. And in the end, it costs her dearly.

Am I stating as an author that it’s bad to attain things like fancy cars and designer clothes? Absolutely not.

What I am positing however, is the need to keep these things in perspective and not lose sight of what truly matters in life. Ken rises from humble beginnings to find impressive success in the corporate world, but it never alters the person he is inside. He remains faithful to the morals and values with which he’s been raised; the same is also true for Madeline, though materially she is not quite as successful.

To Ken, his children are a top priority; to Erin, they are sometimes an afterthought far behind her own wants and desires (though she does truly love them).  In this society we’re living in and specifically in South Florida, I’ve seen parents, divorced or married, more concerned about their social lives than their own kids’ well-being. I’ve witnessed the substitution of money and material things for time, attention and discipline. And I’ve even watched as middle-aged mothers disgracefully competed with their daughters for the affection of a man, or the wink of a stranger’s eye.

Our current culture seems to have jettisoned the concept of growing old gracefully and dressing appropriately (albeit attractively) for one’s age. Our children are worse off because of it, and it’s well past time for good people to help swing the pendulum back. And I hope through my writing I can positively affect the discussion. In the meantime, I am forever grateful for my upbringing by loving parents who cared enough to spend time with, discipline and educate their children.

Fun Fact: The paper I used to write for was The Happy Herald, though at the time it was called The Happy Times Monthly. And yes, my first published piece was indeed titled, My Brother, My Hero in honor of my brother Ralph (Louis in the book), and featured a photo of us on the front page. If my scanner was working properly, I’d include that same photo here, but instead will post this one of the two of us in Deerfield Beach:

Ralph and I having dinner at Duffy's last summer.

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Hank Oprinski’s Profile of Me in the Huntsville Examiner

Back Cover Photo for Water Signs: A Story of Love and Renewal

My Facebook friend and co-contributor to a recent Neidner Show broadcast, Hank Oprinski of PR Online News, has posted a profile piece of me on the Huntsville Examiner. In order to get the maximum exposure for my book and other projects, I must get to 50 comments on the site as soon as possible. If you are so inclined, please click here to read the article and add a comment. Much appreciated!

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The Most Influential Patriot Women of Facebook

Patriot women Ellen Snyder and Daria DiGiovanni with their very tall friend Dan at the first “We Surround Them” event in Greenacres, Florida.

My friends Sharon and Kerrie at the Liberal Heretic recently compiled a list of the most influential patriot women on Facebook. I am humbled and honored to be counted among such an illustrious group that includes:  Real-life friend/fellow activist Ellen Snyder, blogger extraordinaire Tabitha Hale, and good FB friends Stephanie Janiczek (a fellow teammate on an exciting project due out this fall), Kim Brubaker, Caree Severson, and Tina Trimble Belliston.

Sharon notes:

When digg got rid of the shout system, the heretics were forced to move on to greener pastures. So about a year ago we decided to give facebook a shot in order to network our site. Much to our delight, we found an amazing group of people (in the thousands) all with the same goals in mind, to obtain and dessiminate information pretaining to the plight of the country, and to form bonds and friendships with people who share the same value system. Well in the year we have been a part of the facebook patriot network, we have done just that. We want to present to you the women that we feel make a huge impact on facebook. We took the following into consideration when we compiled this list: number of friends, frequency of posts, relevance of posts and how they further the cause, and also we asked the fb community for the women they thought deserved to be mentioned. So here they are in their own words, in no specific order, the God-fearing, America loving, women of Facebook.

Click here to learn about these amazing American women. And thanks again to Sharon and Kerrie!

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